Visit Wichita to Host National Beep Baseball Association World Series

WICHITA, Kan.– Visit Wichita, in partnership with Envision, is set to host the National Beep Baseball Association (NBBA) World Series in Wichita July 25 through August 1 at the South Lakes Soccer Complex for the first time since 1978.

Beep Baseball is baseball geared towards the blind or visually impaired using an enlarged “beeping baseball” to time swings at home plate.

The series offers individuals who are blind or visually impaired an opportunity to compete for a championship and is one of the most renowned sports events for athletes who are blind or visually impaired.

The sport is played with an oversized softball that beeps which allows the batter to time their swing. Visit Wichita was awarded the Beep Baseball World Series of after a competitive process, which included a bid in Braille and a presentation in front of the NBBA Board of Directors and tournament committee.

Envision partnered with Visit Wichita to help create the bid in Braille and will also provide support for the World Series when it takes place in Wichita through promotional assistance, sponsor recruitment, volunteers and sponsorship of the participating Wichita Falcons Beep Baseball team.

“We are honored and thrilled that the NBBA will bring its most prestigious event – Beep Baseball World Series – which showcases some of the sport’s most extraordinary athletes, to Wichita this summer,” said Josh Howell, vice president of sports development at Visit Wichita. “Hosting this event is not only a significant economic boost, but also provides a really unique sporting event for locals and those in the region to attend.”

The event will take place July 27 through Aug. 1 at South Lakes Soccer Complex, with opening ceremonies happening from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. on July 26. All events are open to the media and the public. There is no admission and spectators are encouraged to bring lawn chairs.

One team from Kansas – the Wichita Falcons – and approximately 20 teams from across the United States, Canada, and other countries are expected to travel to Wichita in pursuit of a world championship. Additionally, more than 400 beep baseball players will compete, creating a considerable tourism boost to the local community. The event is expected to generate an estimated 1,500 hotel room

Beep baseball originated in 1964, when Charlie Fairbanks, an engineer with a telephone company, implanted a beeping device in a softball as a way of encouraging athletes who are blind to become involved in recreational activities. Eleven years later, beep baseball enthusiasts formed the National Beep Baseball Association (NBBA) in Chicago. Ever since, the league has played a full schedule of games that begins in the spring and ends in late July or early August.

“Beep baseball empowers individuals to learn about being part of a team, how to build a team, becoming physically fit, increasing self-confidence and competing against others across the United States, Canada, and various other countries annually, for the honor of being champion,” said Blake Boudreaux, President of the NBBA. During the NBBA World Series of beep baseball, teams first compete in grouped round robin play to determine seeding. The tournament then continues as a double elimination tournament to determine the champion. Under this format, teams are guaranteed a minimum of six games, with most teams playing an average of nine.

Beep baseball has many distinctions from the traditional format of baseball. Listed here is a summary of the differences:

  • A beep baseball game lasts six (6) innings. Each game involves a 16-inch softball that contains a noisemaking “beep.” When a pin is pulled from the ball, the beeping noise begins, allowing players to better follow the ball.
  • All players wear blindfolds. While some players are completely blind, others have very limited sight capabilities. The blindfolds serve as an equalizer, a fair way to level the playing field, ensuring that all players are essentially sightless when playing the game.
  • The pitchers, who are typically sighted, throw the ball from 20 feet away. Pitchers are teammates of the hitters, so they try to groove each pitch toward the same spot to maximize the hitter’s rate of success. According to baseballhall.org, the only sighted players on the field are “pitchers, catchers and spotters that help to prevent serious collisions.”
  • Each hitter has up to four strikes, instead of the usual three. When a hitter makes contact, he or she then runs to one of two “bases,” which are located to the left and right of where the first and third base bags would normally be. If the batter reaches one of the two designated bases before the fielding team gains control of the ball, a run is tallied for the offensive team. If the fielding team controls the ball before the batter reaches the goal, the batter is considered out.
  • There is no second base. First and third bases, four-foot padded cylinders with speakers, are placed one hundred feet down the respective lines and ten feet outside the foul lines. The bases contain sounding units that give off a continuous buzzing noise when activated.
  • A player does one of three things when batting: hit the ball and be put out by the defense, hit the ball and score a run, or strike out. A batter is allowed four strikes and one pass ball.

Visit Wichita is proud to host the World Series again, bringing it back to Wichita after more than 40 years.

“It’s another opportunity for a sporting event to draw in visitors from across the country and showcase what an amazing sports city Wichita is, and we can’t wait to play host.”